Tag Archives: Ammi-Joan Paquette

Ghost in the House by Ammi-Joan Paquette, illustrated by Adam Record

ghost_thumbJust in time for Halloween, Ammi-Joan Paquette’s newest picture book Ghost in the House is a must-add title to elementary school libraries and classrooms. It’s fun and shivery and perfect for the preschool and primary grade set. One child I read this to actually squealed and clapped her hands in anticipation at some of the page-turns–can you ask for a better endorsement than that??

Today Biblio Links welcomes back prolific author Ammi-Joan Paquette. Ghost in the House is her third picture book, and she’s got two middle grade and one young adult novel published so far. Her fourth picture book is out this month called  Petey and Pru and the Hullabaloo.

Publisher’s summary:   When a little ghost goes slip-sliding down the hallway, he suddenly hears…a groan! Turns out it’s only a friendly mummy, who shuffles along with the ghost, until they encounter…a monster! As the cautious explorers continue, they find a surprise at every turn — and add another adorably ghoulish friend to the count. But you’ll never guess who is the scariest creature in the house!

Boo! Watch out for this rollicking, cumulative counting book for a Halloween treat that’s more playful than scary.

JoanI asked Joan to tell us how Ghost in the House might fit into your library or classroom.

BiblioLinks:  A student walks into my library and I think: That kid needs a copy of  Ghost in the House. Who is this kid?

Joan: The ideal reader for GHOST IN THE HOUSE is a preschooler who loves humorous, lively stories with a silly side. It’s great for non-readers as an engaging read-aloud, and for emerging readers looking for a simple and highly illustrated text upon which to practice their new skills. It’s a perfect title to pull out around Halloween, though it would work equally well for read-alouds year-round.

BiblioLinks: If we were to peek into a classroom where a teacher is using Ghost in the House in a lesson or with a small group, what might we see?

 Joan: Ghost in the House makes great use of rhyme, and could be great for a unit on this topic. There’s also deductive reasoning in the page turns and anticipating what is to come, as well as prompting a discussion about surprise endings, expectations, and how stories (and life situations) sometimes turn expected tropes upon their head and force us to see everything a little differently than we’d expected to.

 BiblioLinks: Where can teachers, librarians and students learn more about you and your book?

 Joan: Read more about the book at my website, www.ajpaquette.com!

Biblio Links: Thanks for joining us, Joan!

Teachers and librarians, click here for glowing reviews of Ghost in the House.

The Nitty Gritty~

Publisher: Walker Childrens/Bloomsbury

Publication Date: July 2013

ISBN-13: 9780763655297

Interest Level: ages 3-7

Number of Pages: 32

Thanks to Sheila at Book Journeys for starting this meme, and Jen (Teach Mentor Texts) and Kellee (Unleashing Readers) for turning it into a kid-lit meme!

Thanks to Sheila at Book Journeys for starting this meme, and Jen (Teach Mentor Texts) and Kellee (Unleashing Readers) for turning it into a kid-lit meme!

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Paradox by Ammi-Joan Paquette

paradox_thumbToday Biblio Links once again welcomes prolific author Ammi-Joan Paquette! She’s had three picture books and two middle grade novels published so far, with another picture book coming out this fall.

Today’s review is for her thrilling sci-fi debut young adult novel Paradox.

Publisher’s summary:  Fans of James Dashner’s Maze Runner series will love this postapocalyptic adventure about a girl who must survive an alien planet in order to save the Earth.

Ana only knows her name because of the tag she finds pinned to her jumpsuit. Waking in the featureless compartment of a rocket ship, she opens the hatch to discover that she has landed on a barren alien world. Instructions in her pocket tell her to observe and to survive, no doubt with help from the wicked-looking knives she carries on her belt. But to what purpose?

Meeting up with three other teens–one boy seems strangely familiar–Ana treks across the inhospitable landscape, occasionally encountering odd twists of light that carry glimpses of people back on Earth. They’re working on some sort of problem, and the situation is critical. What is the connection between Ana’s mission on this planet and the crisis back on Earth, and how is she supposed to figure out the answer when she can’t remember anything?

~

Once I realized that I could NOT put this book down, I immediately thought of several reluctant readers in my library who would love this fast-paced, sci-fi mystery. It’s got a strong female main character, an unfolding mystery, high stakes, danger, and a fascinating other-world setting. Really, what’s not to love?

As a librarian in a very culturally diverse school district, one of the things I appreciate most about Paradox is something I haven’t seen mentioned in other reviews:  the book’s multicultural cast of characters. Ana Ortez is the main character, and she is eventually joined by three other teens, Todd Oslow, Ysa Klein, and Chen Wai. Race or culture doesn’t factor into the plot or dialogue at all. Love that.

JoanI asked Joan to tell us how Paradox might fit into your library or classroom.

BiblioLinks:  A student walks into my library and I think, That kid needs a copy of Paradox. Who is this kid?

Joan: The ideal PARADOX reader is a student who looks for fast-paced stories and benefits from highly active, engaging storylines. It’s a spare, quick read that would be ideal for reluctant readers. It’s also great for kids with a scientific inclination, and those who like to puzzle out problems and collect data to come to a conclusion. The perfect read for analytical thinkers who want to put their active brains to recreational use!

BiblioLinks: I agree, Joan–this book will definitely appeal to reluctant (and avid!) readers. If we were to peek into a classroom where a teacher is using Paradox in a lesson or with a small group, what might we see?

 Joan: There are many science-based springboard discussions that could arise from this book: the development of disease and how contagious agents could be spread across a global landscape; the very real developments of space travel and the recent discovery of potentially habitable planets; rotation of binary solar systems and how they differ from our own. There’s also a lot of story connections to be made, connecting the generational links and organizing them into a time-sequential storyline, understanding the logic of how the different elements in the book all fit together. Students might also use the enclosed news articles as a springboard to writing their own articles highlighting recent real-life scientific breakthroughs they find exciting and groundbreaking.

 BiblioLinks: Lots of STEM connections for educators to explore. In addition to using the newspapers articles as springboards like you mentioned, the interview transcript with Ana’s mother could also spark spin-offs where students could create mock interviews with other characters in the story. The present-tense, third person point of view would also make for some interesting discussions.

Where can teachers, librarians and students learn more about you and your book?

 Joan: You can find me on the web at www.ajpaquette.com, and for more about PARADOX specifically, visit the Random Buzzers forum to read some Q&As from teen readers here, or drop by here to read the opening chapter.

Biblio Links: Thanks for joining us, Joan!

Teachers and librarians, click here for rave reviews of Paradox.

The Nitty Gritty~

Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers

Publication Date: June 2013

ISBN-13: 978-0375869624

Interest Level: ages 12 and up

Number of Pages: 240

Visit Shannon Messenger's website for more marvelous middle grade titles!

Although Paradox is a young adult title, it’s recommended for ages 12 and up, so I’ve included it in Shannon Messenger’s Marvelous Middle Grade Monday round up. Click here to visit her blog for more middle grade recommendations.

Thanks to Sheila at Book Journeys for starting this meme, and Jen (Teach Mentor Texts) and Kellee (Unleashing Readers) for turning it into a kid-lit meme!

Thanks to Sheila at Book Journeys for starting this meme, and Jen (Teach Mentor Texts) and Kellee (Unleashing Readers) for turning it into a kid-lit meme!

The Tiptoe Guide series, written by Ammi-Joan Paquette

Today Biblio Links welcomes prolific author Ammi-Joan Paquette!

Joan’s first book The Tiptoe Guide to Tracking Fairies, was published last year. She followed that picture book with a lovely middle grade novel, Nowhere Girl  and now she celebrates the release of her second Tiptoe book, The Tiptoe Guide to Tracking Mermaids.

And that’s not all…Joan has several more picture books under contract as well as a young adult novel. Needless to say, this isn’t the last we’ll see of Joan here on BiblioLinks!

My own children and students love the whimsical Tiptoe books. These books are beautifully illustrated, poetic invitations to explore the world around us, whether it be our own backyards or our imaginations. They are meant to be shared with a child.

I asked Joan to tell us how her books fit into the classroom.

BiblioLinks:  A student walks into my library and I think, That kid needs a copy of THE TIPTOE GUIDE TO TRACKING MERMAIDS or THE TIPTOE GUIDE TO TRACKING FAIRIES. Who is this kid?

Joan: This kid is one who loves nature, enjoys spending time in the outdoors, and would go barefoot every day if allowed. This child might have a leaf collection in his or her room, might press wildflowers between the pages of the big dictionary, and comes back from walks with pockets full of interestingly-shaped rocks. These books are also for the child who loves magic, who is open to seeing the possibilities in the mundane everyday; the child who still believes, who keeps her sense of wonder. It’s for any child who has ever strapped on wings and wished she could fly.

BiblioLinks: If we were to peek into a classroom where a teacher is using the Tiptoe  books in a lesson or with a small group, what might we see?

 Joan: I see the TIPTOE GUIDES as a springboard into the natural world. In these days of overabundant electronics, when everything around is beeping and buzzing and whirring, I see these books as a window into the magical world that lies just outside the front door. Not only for use at recess and free play, however, there are many classroom applications—from plant life studies, to animal habitats, to planning a nature collection, and more.

 BiblioLinks: Where can teachers, librarians and students learn more about you and your book?

 Joan: You can visit me at my website, ammijoanpaquette.com, and  you can also stop by the publisher’s website atwww.tanglewoodbooks.com

Biblio Links: Thanks for joining us, Joan!

Teachers and librarians, click here for glowing reviews. For a peek inside Mermaids, click here, and these links give you a peek into Fairies. Click here for a curriculum guide to using Fairies with students.

The Nitty Gritty~

Publisher: Tanglewood Press

Publication Dates: September, 2011 and February 2012

ISBN-13: 978-1933718507–The Tiptoe Guide to Tracking Fairies

ISBN-13: 978-1933718590–The Tiptoe Guide to Tracking Mermaids

Interest Level: 3-8 years

Number of Pages: 32