Category Archives: non-fiction

Anne Frank’s Chestnut Tree by Jane Kohuth, illustrated by Elizabeth Sayles

51a+Y+gSxDL._SY346_Publisher’s description: Hidden away in their Secret Annex in Amsterdam during World War II, Anne Frank and her family could not breathe fresh air or see the blue sky for years. But through an attic window Anne could see the branches of a tall chestnut tree. This small glimpse of nature gave Anne hope and courage. It inspired her writing, which, in turn, inspired the whole world. Jane Kohuth explores Anne Frank’s strong belief in the healing power of nature in this Step 3 leveled reader biography for newly independent readers ages 5–8.

My thoughts: As soon as I read the e-galley (Thank you, Random House Children’s and Edelweiss!) of Anne Frank’s Chestnut Tree, I ordered a copy for our school library. Many of my students check out The Diary of Anne Frank but end up not finishing it because of the reading level or because they don’t quite understand it. This version is part of Random House’s Step Into Reading (Level 3) early chapter book program, and I was happy to see that the illustrations, text, and handling of the subject matter are indeed appropriate for grades 1 to 3.

Several lines from Anne’s diary are woven seamlessly into the text, lending an authenticity to the storyline. Here’s an excerpt from the second page-spread in the book:

“‘As long as this exists, this sunshine and this cloudless sky, and as long as I can enjoy it, how can I be sad?’ The girl’s name was Anne Frank. She had not been outside for 597 days.”

You’ve got Anne’s own words, her name, and then a hook that begs for the next page-turn.

Even the complicated and horrific motives behind the Second World War are delivered in a straightforward manner that’s easy to understand:

“The Nazis blamed the world’s problems on Jewish people, even though they were a small minority. Anne and her family were Jewish.”

As adults, it’s easy to forget that a child first reading about Anne Frank may not know how Anne’s story ends. The arrest of Anne and her family is told in two simple sentences:

“But on August 4, 1944, the police found the Secret Annex.The Nazis sent Anne’s family and two of their helpers to concentration camps.”

The only reference to a concentration camp is earlier on, when the Nazis wanted to send Anne’s sister away, prompting the family to go into hiding:

“Anne’s parents knew that when Jews were sent away, they were never heard from again.”

Even Anne’s sad ending does not include any detail that might be disturbing for a young child:

“Anne did not survive the war. But her diary did.”

The book doesn’t end here, though; it comes full circle with the same chestnut tree in the opening of the story–the one that Anne used to gaze at from the window of the attic in the Secret Annex. The people of Amsterdam kept the chestnut tree alive, even when it had a disease, until a storm brought it down in 2010. Even then, saplings from this tree were planted all over the city and the world, including the United States.

An author’s note and photograph of the building where Anne and her family hid will help children to understand that this is indeed a true story.

Highly recommended.

Hand this book to the kid who:

* has heard of Anne Frank but may not yet be ready to read her diary

* is interested in World War II

* enjoys biographies

* needs an example of strength and hope in hard times

Use this to teach:

Biographies–Although this reads like fiction, it is 100% non-fiction–no invented dialogue in these pages.

*The themes of courage and overcoming adversity–The Holocaust is obviously not part of any primary grade curriculum, but this book could definitely be included in a study of books with themes of courage or overcoming adversity.

*The Holocaust–I know–I just said that young children don’t learn about the Holocaust in school, but some upper elementary children do, and  middle school students definitely do. If you’ve got an older struggling reader or a students who is learning English, this title would work well for differentiating instruction. Or if you’re reading aloud a book like Lois Lowery’s Number the Stars and you create a display of other books about World War II, definitely include this one.

The Nitty Gritty~

Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers

Publication Date: September 24, 2013

ISBN-10: 0449812553

ISBN-13: 978-0449812556

Number of Pages: 48

Interest Level: K-3

Thanks to Sheila at Book Journeys for starting this meme, and Jen (Teach Mentor Texts) and Kellee (Unleashing Readers) for turning it into a kid-lit meme! Click here for more Monday reviews.

Thanks to Sheila at Book Journeys for starting this meme, and Jen (Teach Mentor Texts) and Kellee (Unleashing Readers) for turning it into a kid-lit meme! Click here for more Monday reviews.

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Sally's Bookshelf for hosting today!

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Stacking Books for hosting today! Click here for more Non-Fiction recommendations…

Break These Rules: 35 YA Authors on Speaking Up, Standing Out, and Being Yourself

Jacket.aspxHappy Book Birthday to Break These Rules: 35 YA Authors on Speaking Up, Standing Out, and Being Yourself, edited by writer, educator, and editor-extraordinaire Luke Reynolds!

Last summer, Luke asked me if I would like to contribute an essay to a project that he was putting together to benefit the Children’s Defense Fund–a collection of essays for teens. He wanted me to choose one of society’s unwritten rules and tell not only how I broke that rule, but why teens should, too.

Mind you, as a mother, teacher, and librarian, there are oodles of rules that I follow every day. But some rules beg to be challenged, and I jumped at the chance to contribute to this anthology. And then I found out who the rest of the contributors were–award-winners like Katherine Erskine, A.S. King, Thanhha Lai, Gary SchmidtFrancisco X. Stork, and Sara Zarr.

Gulp.

And many, many other favorite authors of mine–34 in all, to be exact. But I decided to break the Be Intimidated By Greatness rule, and decided instead to be inspired.

School Library Journal  calls the essays “inspiring and thought-provoking,” saying, “As readers head back to the classrooms this fall, these essays can serve as discussion starters and give readers a jumping-off point for thinking about the bigger picture and life after high school.”

Here’s the Publisher‘s description: In Break These Rules, 35 favorite middle grade and young adult authors—including Kathryn Erskine, A. S. King, Matthew Quick, Sara Zarr, Gary Schmidt, and many others—speak directly to their readers and advise them to break the boundaries of conformity. In moving, inspiring, and often funny essays, they take on many of the powerfully inhibiting and unspoken “rules” of adolescence, such as Boys shouldn’t be gentle, kind, and caring; Thou shalt wear Abercrombie & Fitch to fit in; You must be a jock or a nerd—you can’t be both; and Girls should “act like girls.” It is often through reading fiction that kids start to question such restrictions, so who better to speak to them directly than their favorite novelists? The book is focused on encouraging students to break rules in their own lives—a prospect many teens and tweens will find thrilling and fresh.

Hand this book to the kid who:

* Is nervous or unsure about fitting in–maybe a student new to the school or someone who feels left out.

*  Enjoys the work of any of the authors in the anthology.

* Reluctant readers who may be intimidated by reading an entire novel–they can dip into this book and read only the essays with topics that interest them.

Use this to teach:

* Personal narrative–This is the form of writing often used in standardized testing, and this book offers 35 examples of the form for analysis.

* Voice/tone–Some of the essays are funny, some heart-wrenching, others are somewhere in between. It might be an interesting exercise to have students choose an essay and compare it to the tone and voice used by the author in his or her work.

* Anti-Bullying— Aside from the classroom or school library, this would make a good addition to any school guidance counselor’s bookshelf. It would also pair nicely with the It Gets Better campaign.

The Nitty Gritty~

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

Publication Date: September 1, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1-61374-784-1

Number of Pages: 208

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to A Mom's Spare Time  for hosting today! Click here for more non-fiction titles for kids.

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to A Mom’s Spare Time for hosting today! Click here for more non-fiction titles for kids.

And the Winner Is…Amazing Animal Athletes by Etta Kaner, illustrated by David Anderson

amazing animalThere’s a lot packed into these 31 pages–a comic-style layout, sidebars with quick facts about the featured animals, running jokes from the peanut-gallery sports fans and event participants–yet it doesn’t feel too crowded or overwhelming. Even the page set-up is well planned, with a double page spread introducing four animals and their attributes, then asking the reader to guess which of the four would take the gold medal in a particular skill–speed, high jumping, etc. Turn the page to find out the winner and how a human’s performance in the same event would compare. Each animal’s size is taken into consideration, so the winner isn’t always the animal you’d think. For example, the best long-jumper is the Rocket Striped Frog–in proportion to its size, the length of its jump would compare to a human jumping the length of a football field.

Although the publisher says that this is for readers from ages 4 to 8, I would definitely hand this to older kids who are struggling and/or reluctant readers.

Publisher’s description:  In this unique facts book, animals compete in sporting events such as high jump, swimming and weight lifting. Readers are encouraged to guess which animal will win before turning the page, while walrus and cockatoo “announcers” provide funny commentary and interesting statistics about the athletes’ amazing abilities. This is a winning format for kids who want to know which animals can be faster, stronger and more powerful, and how humans compare.

Hand this book to the kid who:

* is interested in animal facts

* reads joke books, riddles, and plays on words

* enjoys comics and graphic novels

* loves numbers, stats, and math challenges

Use this to teach:

Animal Units–All students in the U.S. study animals and habitats at some point during their elementary school years. In addition to the animal facts, there’s also a quick review of habitats around the globe at the start of the book.

* Research--This would make a nice springboard for kids’ own animal research projects. Using the same format, students could come up with their own events and animal participants.

*Predicting–Children can use their own background knowledge to make predictions at first. Once they’ve caught on that the winners aren’t always the obvious choices, they’ll likely make more thoughtful predictions as they read further.

*Proportion–Challenge older  kids to calculate how other animals would fare in similar competitions.

* Olympics–Display this alongside traditional sports books for a winning Olympic display.

The Nitty Gritty~

Click here for reviews.

Publisher: Kids Can Press

Publication Date: April 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1-55453-904-8

Number of Pages: 31

Reading Level: Fountas & Pinnell: N (3rd grade)

Interest Level: Ages 4 to 8 (Although I’d give this to older struggling readers in a heartbeat…)

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Prose and Kahn for hosting today!

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Prose and Kahn for hosting today!

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Click here for more children’s book recommendations that highlight science, technology, engineering and math!

Bone by Bone: Comparing Animal Skeletons by Sara Levine, illustrated by T.S. Spookytooth

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Publisher’s description: What animal would you be if your finger bones grew so long that they reached your feet? Or what if you had no leg bones but kept your arm bones? This picture book will keep you guessing as you read about how human skeletons are like—and unlike—those of other animals.

My thoughts: As soon as I read the e-galley of Bone by Bone, I ordered a copy for our school library. It’s rare to find a book on life science that’s so appealing for very young children, yet has lots to offer for upper elementary kids, as well.

The various fonts are visually appealing without feeling too busy, and delightful illustrations  help readers to imagine what they might look like if they had, say, extra vertebrae (a tail) or finger bones that reached the ground (like a bat’s webbed fingers). The information is delivered in a clear, straightforward manner with a Q&A format that will get kids predicting before each page-turn.

The back matter–sections titled More About Bones and More About Vertebrates, and recommended books and websites for further reading–can all be used for differentiating instruction for kids who want to go more in depth with the information in the book. Struggling readers or English Language Learners can use the illustrations to grasp the book’s main idea.

Although this is an any-time-of-year book, it would be fun to include Bone by Bone in a Halloween display. Highly recommended.

P.S.: Scroll down this post’s comments section for some great ideas suggested by the author herself, Sara Levine.

Hand this book to the kid who:

* is curious about how things work

* loves animals (Bone by Bone‘s author, Sara Levine, is a veterinarian)

* claims to be a budding scientist

* Enjoys “guessing” books with a Q&A format

Use this to teach:

Animal Units–All students in the U.S. study animals and habitats at some point during their elementary school years. Most non-fiction animal books for young children cover the basics: habitat, diet, life cycle, protection, etc.. But if you’re teaching kids to use more than one print resource in a research project, this would give them additional facts not usually found elsewhere.

*Comparing–One of the things I like best about this book is that every skeletal feature that the reader learns about an animal is compared to what that same feature would look like in a human. Older kids can use math to calculate comparisons by percentage. For example, the book tells us that a giraffe vertebrae is 10 inches long. Let kids research how long the average human vertebrae is and calculate the giraffe-to-kid ratio.

*Health–With all of the math, language arts, science and social studies standards that we have to cover in a year, health is that subject on the report card that often gets the short shrift. Using Bone by Bone in the classroom covers language arts, science, math and, that report card step child known as health.

* Non-Fiction Text Features–Introduce young readers to these non-fiction text features from the book: labels, key words in color (vertebrates and non-vertibrates), and glossary

The Nitty Gritty~

Classroom resources and author interview here.

Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group/Millbrook Press

Publication Date: August 1, 2013

ISBN-10: 0-7613-8464-2

ISBN-13: 978-0-7613-8464-9

Number of Pages: 32

Interest Level: K-4

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Sally's Bookshelf for hosting today!

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Sally’s Bookshelf for hosting today!

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Click here for more children’s book recommendations that highlight science, technology, engineering and math!

How Do You Burp in Space? And Other Tips Every Space Tourist Needs to Know by Susan E. Goodman, illustrated by Michael Slack

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Abby the Librarian for hosting today!

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Abby the Librarian for hosting today!

Welcome to Non-Fiction Monday! Feel free to add a link to your own Nonfiction Monday post and I’ll update as the day goes on. Scroll all the way down to see the recommendations.

It’s also What Are You Reading Monday…

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…and Marvelous Middle Grade Monday,    so check out Teach Mentor Texts, Unleashing Readers, and Shannon Messenger‘s site for more kid lit recommendations.

On to my non-fiction review for today…

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I’ve read oodles of books on space and astronauts,  but this is the only one I’ve seen in guide-book format. The voice is friendly, accessible, and informative, and gives readers an idea of what it might be like to actually travel in space–not as an astronaut, per se, but as a tourist. It’s packed full of facts that will appeal to reluctant readers–how to burp in space, go to the bathroom in orbit, and sleep while acting as a satellite. But it also explains the science behind everything that happens in a space craft, and the author’s note tells how research factored into this engaging work of non-fiction.

Publisher’s description:  Want to blast into orbit? Walk on the moon? Snag a personal photo of a shooting star? Well your time is coming! And when it does, you’re going to need How Do You Burp in Space? 

This guide is filled with the kind of information you’d need to plan any vacation including what to pack (hint: no bubble bath or juggling balls!); what to expect from your accomodations (a sleeping bag attached to the wall), and what to do for fun (leapfrog on the moon!). Grounded in the history of space travel and the planned future of space tourism, this guide book will leave young adventurers daydreaming about future intergalactic space vacations. Get ready to rock your rocketship!

Hand this book to the kid who:

* is interested in space travel

* likes to read text in small chunks–there are lots of sidebars, including quotes from astronauts, that break up the text into manageable  chunks for reluctant readers

* enjoys cartoon-like illustrations–illustrator Michael Slack blends his illustrations with photos from space, and they’re loads of fun to look at!

Use this to teach:

Facts About Space–While this is an obvious curriculum tie-in, the facts in the book are likely to remain in a kid’s head because they’re related to how a space traveler would experience a trip in space. The book debunks the myth that there is no gravity in space, and offers a crystal-clear explanation of why.

* Motivational Role Models--In an age where movie stars, athletes and singers don’t always behave themselves, astronauts make for a refreshing set of role models for kids (and adults, for that matter…).

*Non-Fiction Text Features–Includes a table of contents, sidebars, captions, glossary, space timeline, and index.

Visit the author’s Website here and illustrator’s site here.

The Nitty Gritty~

Click  here for reviews.

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Childrens

Publication Date: July 9, 2013

ISBN-10: 1599900688

ISBN-13: 978-1599900681

Number of Pages: 80

Interest Level: 8 and up

Sondra has another PB biography recommendation over at Sonderbooks Review.

Sondy has another PB biography recommendation over at Sonderbooks Review.

Visit Abby the Librarian for a review of this YA memoir.

Visit Abby the Librarian for a review of this YA memoir.

Alex over at Randomly Reading has a review on this Willie Mays biography.

Alex over at Randomly Reading has a review on this Willie Mays biography.

Click here for a review of Bad Girls at Jean Little LIbrary.

Click here for a review of Bad Girls at Jean Little LIbrary.

Visit Mrs. Yingling's blog today a review of this PB biography.

Visit Ms. Yingling’s blog today  for a review of this PB biography.

Reshamad warns of a possible cuteness overload on this review!  Check it out on Stacking Books.

Reshamad warns of a possible cuteness overload over at Stacking Books!

All green thumbs head to  Wrapped in Foil for Roberta's review.

All green thumbs head to Wrapped in Foil for Roberta’s review!

Head over to the Non-Fiction Detectives for this review.

Head over to the Non-Fiction Detectives for this review.

Head over to Prose and Kahn for Brenda's review.

Head over to Prose and Kahn for Brenda’s review.

Click here for Lisa's review at Shelf-employed.

Click here for Lisa’s review at Shelf-employed.

Click here for Jeff's review over at NC Teacher Stuff.

Click here for Jeff’s review over at NC Teacher Stuff.

Etched in Clay: The Life of Dave, Enslaved Potter and Poet by Andrea Cheng

Etched in ClayThere are a slew of books already written about the Civil War era, slavery, and civil rights. Etched in Clay, by Andrea Cheng, is unique in that it is aimed at a middle grade and young adult audience, yet the spare prose makes it accessible to a wide range of reading levels. Dave’s story is powerful, and I’m in awe of  Cheng’s ability to use a few hand-picked words to pack such an emotional punch. Lovely, sad, and–above all–hopeful.

Book summary from the author’s website:   Sometime around 1815, an enslaved young man named Dave was brought to Edgefield, South Carolina, the center of a pottery-producing area known for the alkaline glazes used on the stoneware. Dave was taught how to turn pots and jars on a pottery wheel by one of his first owners. As Dave’s talent flourished, he created pieces of great beauty and often massive size. He also somehow learned to read and write, in spite of South Carolina’s strongly-held fear of slave literacy. And then Dave did something even more incredible—he began to sign his jars and carve many of them with sayings and poems that reflected his daily life and experiences. He spoke out against slavery not by protesting or revolting, but by daring to write at all.

Andrea Cheng has crafted a biography in verse as beautiful as one of Dave’s jars. In simple, powerful words, including some of Dave’s original writings, we learn his extraordinary story of courage, creative inspiration, and triumph. Today Dave is considered to be a master craftsperson whose jars are among the most sought-after pieces of Edgefield pottery.

Hand this book to the kid who:

* is learning about slavery and civil rights in class,

* enjoys poetry, or thinks poetry is hard, must rhyme, or is boring,

* is an artist, particularly one interested in clay,

* and needs a real-life example of someone who stood up for freedom in quiet ways.

Use this book to teach:

* Civil War Era History–Dave’s story begins before the Civil War, continues through the war years and beyond during Reconstruction. Because of the spare prose, it would be especially useful for ELLs (English Language Learners) who may not have background information on the U.S. Civil War period.

* Poetry--In the author’s note, Cheng explains that the transcriptions of Dave’s writing writings came from Leonard Todd’s Carolina Clay: The Life and Legend of the Slave Potter Dave. In preserving Dave’s original spelling, punctuation, and wording, Cheng hoped the reader would get a true picture of his poetry, thoughts, and feelings.

*Civil Disobedience–This would make a perfect companion to any study  of civil disobedience alongside other real-life figures such as  Mohatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as fictitious ones (think Number the Stars by Louis Lowry or even M.T. Anderson’s Feed).

For elementary audiences, pair with:

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Curriculum Guide here.

The Nitty Gritty~

Click here for reviews and Andrea Cheng’s inspiration for writing the book.

Publisher: Lee and Low Books

Publication Date: January 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1600604515

Number of Pages: 160

Reading Level: 5.0 (F&P level T)

Interest Level:  Grades 4-12

Thanks to Sheila at Book Journeys for starting this meme, and Jen (Teach Mentor Texts) and Kellee (Unleashing Readers) for turning it into a kid-lit meme!

Thanks to Sheila at Book Journeys for starting this meme, and Jen (Teach Mentor Texts) and Kellee (Unleashing Readers) for turning it into a kid-lit meme!

 

Thanks to Anastasia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Abby the Librarian for hosting today!

Thanks to Anatastia Suen for creating Non-Fiction Mondays, and to Abby the Librarian for hosting today!

 

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And many thanks to Shannon Messenger for creating and hosting Marvelous Middle Grade Mondays!

Brothers At Bat by Audrey Vernick, illustrated by Steven Salerno

Today Biblio Links welcomes back author Audrey Vernick!

Her latest picture book, Brothers At Bat, releases into the world today. Here’s the blurb from Houghton Mifflin:

The Acerra family had sixteen children, including twelve ball-playing boys. It was the 1930s, and many families had lots of kids. But only one had enough to field a baseball team . . . with three on the bench! The Acerras were the longest-playing all-brother team in baseball history. They loved the game, but more important, they cared for
and supported each other and stayed together as a team. Nothing life threw their way could stop them. Full of action, drama, and excitement, this never-before-told true story is vividly brought to life by Audrey Vernick’s expert storytelling and Steven Salerno’s stunning vintage-style art.

I can’t help opening my review of Brothers At Bat with these words from Baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr.:

“I was lucky to play in the big leagues with my brother as a teammate and my dad as our manager. It was a very special time. The story of the Acerra brothers brought those memories back. It is a wonderful illustration of what a great game baseball is and how it brings families together on many different levels. BROTHERS AT BAT is a story any baseball fan will enjoy and one that we all should know.”

I love, love, love picture books that have layers that allow me to differentiate for kids of different ages. On the surface, this is a baseball book, a book about teamwork and family and making it through tough times with the support of people who love you–which would be more than enough for one lesson plan. But I can also branch off and discuss some of the deeper issues with older kids, like World War II (six Acerra brothers went off to fight and all came home), roles of women (the four Acerra sisters didn’t play baseball) and the age of modern technology (When the family is honored at the 1939 World Fair for being the largest family in New Jersey, they flew on an airplane for the very first time).

Like any picture book worth its salt, the illustrations add another layer to the story, and Steven Salerno’s art does this spectacularly. The retro-style art gives readers a feel for the setting–both time and place. Primary students everywhere learn about “Then and Now” in Social Studies, and this book is stuffed full of things that kids could reference when comparing the first half of the 20th century with how we live now–including cars, clothing, and, yes, even  outhouses.

I asked Audrey about how kids might connect with Brothers At Bat.

Biblio Links: A student walks into my library and I think, That kid needs a copy of Brothers At Bat. Who is this kid?

Audrey Vernick: This kid might think he doesn’t like to read, because he’s really into sports. Or maybe it’s a kid who thinks history is boring. It might also be a child from a big family or an only child who wonders what it would be like to have more than a dozen siblings.

Biblio Links: If we were to peek into a classroom where a teacher is using your book in a lesson or with a small group, what might we see?

Audrey Vernick: If you happened to walk in at the time all the characters are introduced, you might see some chins on the ground from the jaw-dropping fact that this family had sixteen children.

Biblio Links: Where can teachers, librarians and students learn more about you and your book?

Audrey Vernick: There’s more information on my website,

www.audreyvernick.com and blog
http://literaryfriendships.wordpress.com/

Coming soon to the website: Discussion guide AND video clip of the Acerra brothers playing baseball!!

My BROTHERS AT BAT appearances include these big-ticket stops:

3/31 Books of Wonder, NYC,  with illustrator Steven Salerno (part of panel discussion on baseball books)
4/12 Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY, 1 PM talk followed by book-signing
6/9 Eric Carle Museum, Amherst, MA, Children’s Book Festival: Baseball Bonanza

Thanks for stopping by, Audrey!

Thanks so much, Natalie!!

 Check out Audrey’s other picture books, Is Your Buffalo Ready for Kindergarten? and Teach Your Buffalo To Play The Drums, picture book biography She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story and middle grade novel Water Balloon.

Click here for home run  reviews (including THREE starred reviews!) of Brothers At Bat.

The Nitty Gritty~

Publisher: Clarion Book (Houghton Mifflin)

Publication Date: April 3, 2012

ISBN-10: 0547385579

ISBN-13: 978-0547385579

Interest Level: Ages 4 and up

Number of Pages: 40